As I look back, it is easy to see how God has opened doors and relationships that were necessary to bring about this ministry.

“As I look back, it is easy to see how God has opened doors and relationships that were necessary to bring about this ministry,” says Bryan R. Zeamer, Men of Iron Founder and Chairman of the Board. From his career to his family, mentoring had always been a meaningful part of his life.

It was after a conference in 2006 that Men of Iron began to take shape. A sermon entitled ‘Holy Discontent’ by Bill Hybels got Bryan thinking. “How could I use my experience and gifts to make a difference for the Kingdom? What was my Holy Discontent?”

Back at home, the question remained on his heart. A conversation with his wife, Heather, made it clear. “Heather knew it right away. My Holy Discontent is when men don’t do what they’re called to do — as husbands and fathers, in their career, community and church. At that very moment, I knew God was calling me to do something with mentoring.”

“Men are defeated when they don’t realize their full purpose. I saw a culture of apathy around us and a culture that tells men they’re not worth much,” Bryan says. “But when men get it right, everything and everyone around them can flourish. A willing man who wants to take steps to be a Godly leader, that’s a wonderful thing.”

Bryan’s experiences with wrestling and business coaches, consultants, peer accountability groups and his own mentors taught him the importance of accountability and friendship. “I know first-hand how a one-on-one experience can sharpen you.” It was clear God had called him to build a mentoring ministry.

The ministry began with just 20 men: 10 protégés and 10 mentors. Over the next several years, Men of Iron grew exponentially. Today, Bryan is Chairman of the Board, and the Men of Iron team continues to grow.

Since establishing this mentoring program, God has used Men of Iron to change lives, save marriages and fix broken relationships. “When men seek God and have the know-how and encouragement and accountability, they can really thrive.”